papress:

Farming Cuba — A new model for cities and countries facing threats to food security brought on by the end of cheap oil

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, Cuba found itself solely responsible for feeding a nation that had grown dependent on imports and trade subsidies. Citizens began growing their own organic produce anywhere they could find space, on rooftops, balconies, vacant lots, and even school playgrounds. By 1998 there were more than 8,000 urban farms in Havana producing nearly half of the country’s vegetables. What began as a grassroots initiative had, in less than a decade, grown into the largest sustainable agriculture initiative ever undertaken, making Cuba the world leader in urban farming. Learn more in Farming Cuba: Urban Agriculture from the Ground Up, by Carey Clouse, available now from PAPress.

(via thisbigcity)

tokidoki-hokeypokey:

A Ghibli movie raided the train.

(via urbangreens)

ryanpanos:

Almost Architecture #18 | Alva Sondakh

wherearchitectureisfun:

WAÏF: Postcards from Luna Park

Source

(via ryanpanos)

ombuarchitecture:

Aerial Views of American Sprawl

By Christoph Gielen

Christoph Gielen’s aerial views offer a look at America’s most aberrant and unusual sprawl forms in ways we usually don’t get to see them: from far above the ground—a vantage point that reveals both the intricate geometry as well as the idiosyncratic allure of these developments.

1. Nevada _ 2. Florida _ 3. Arizona _ 4.Florida _ 5. Arizona _ 6. Nevada_

7. Texas

via Plataforma Arquitectura

(via concepturbanization)

drawingarchitecture:

Ricardo A. Leon, "Legacy Archive", 2013, Mixed Media.

drawingarchitecture:

Ricardo A. Leon, "Legacy Archive", 2013, Mixed Media.

(via ryanpanos)

BUILDING BLOCKS

cloudzwatching:

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BUILDING BLOCKS - Nikole Cabrera

Syracuse University (Jimenez Lai)

Building Blocks is a comic book about two characters, a toddler and a baby, in which the toddler is constantly constructing this world and the baby is repetitively destroying it. It is told through the perspective of the imaginary people who live in these blocks and follows their schedule through a typical day. What we ordinarily see as building blocks in our lives at one scale, can be fantastical architecture at another.



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ryanpanos:

Stationary Bikes Get Brazilian Prisoners Closer to Freedom | Via
For prison inmates in Brazil, good behavior isn’t the only thing that gets them closer to freedom—pedaling a bike to help power a nearby town can, too.
Through an innovative—and eco-friendly—program, prisoners can cut down their sentences by putting in some time on stationary bikes hooked up to car batteries, according to the Associated Press. As the inmates pedal, the car batteries are charged.
The charged-up batteries are then used to illuminate 10 street lamps in the nearby town of Santa Rita do Sapucai. The town’s mayor told the AP he came up with the idea after learning about gyms in the United States that use electricity generated by exercise bikes.
Volunteers in the medium-security prison earn one day off their sentence for every three eight-hour shifts they spend on the bikes, which were salvaged from the local police department’s lost and found. One inmate has already reduced his sentence by 20 days, and his weight by about 9 pounds, thanks to the two-month-old program.

The power provided by those incarcerated in Santa Rita do Sapucai has revived a riverside promenade once abandoned after dark, according to locals. Now with the street lamps powered, the area attracts dog walkers, joggers, and kids on bikes.

ryanpanos:

Stationary Bikes Get Brazilian Prisoners Closer to Freedom | Via

For prison inmates in Brazil, good behavior isn’t the only thing that gets them closer to freedom—pedaling a bike to help power a nearby town can, too.

Through an innovative—and eco-friendly—program, prisoners can cut down their sentences by putting in some time on stationary bikes hooked up to car batteries, according to the Associated Press. As the inmates pedal, the car batteries are charged.

The charged-up batteries are then used to illuminate 10 street lamps in the nearby town of Santa Rita do Sapucai. The town’s mayor told the AP he came up with the idea after learning about gyms in the United States that use electricity generated by exercise bikes.

Volunteers in the medium-security prison earn one day off their sentence for every three eight-hour shifts they spend on the bikes, which were salvaged from the local police department’s lost and found. One inmate has already reduced his sentence by 20 days, and his weight by about 9 pounds, thanks to the two-month-old program.

The power provided by those incarcerated in Santa Rita do Sapucai has revived a riverside promenade once abandoned after dark, according to locals. Now with the street lamps powered, the area attracts dog walkers, joggers, and kids on bikes.