humansofnewyork:

"We’re all victims of the architect. Architecture is the only art that you can’t help but feel. You can avoid paintings, you can avoid music, and you can even avoid history. But good luck getting away from architecture."

humansofnewyork:

"We’re all victims of the architect. Architecture is the only art that you can’t help but feel. You can avoid paintings, you can avoid music, and you can even avoid history. But good luck getting away from architecture."

ryanpanos:

Yom Kippur, The Day When Israel Goes Car Free | Via

For twenty-four hours each year, all cars goes off the road all over Israel in celebration of Yom Kippur, also known as Day of Atonement - the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people. And it’s not just cars. All airplanes, trains and all public transportation stop moving. No music plays over the radio, television stops broadcasting, and all shops and businesses remain shut down. For one day, Israel resembles a scene from a post apocalypse movie.

Throughout the country, air pollution plummets a whopping 99% -  in some places nearly eliminating the presence of nitrogen oxides, a prominent contaminant in motor vehicle emissions. The air smells good, the visibility gets better and the distant roar of traffic is comfortably absent. Residents take advantage of this day and goes out for walks along the empty city streets. Some take out their bicycles, roller blades and skateboards. The dramatic decline of pollution on Yom Kippur indicates just how polluted the air is the rest of the year.

ryanpanos:

Elements | Via
In “Elements,” an exhibition and accompanying book for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, Rem Koolhaas seeks to explore the omnipresent components of buildings that have never been intentionally articulated by architectural theory. Breaking down the history of architecture into its fundamental components, the text is divided into 15 volumes and functions as “a technophilic treatise on the state of architectural thinking in the twenty-first century.” Despite providing lessons in architectural history, does the book deliver a compelling synthesis of all its parts? In his full review of the book for Metropolis Magazine, Samuel Medina argues that Koolhaas “fails to unpack the language of his argument,” resulting in a book that is “ambitious, overreaching, maddening” – much like the exhibition itself.

ryanpanos:

Elements | Via

In “Elements,” an exhibition and accompanying book for the 2014 Venice Architecture BiennaleRem Koolhaas seeks to explore the omnipresent components of buildings that have never been intentionally articulated by architectural theory. Breaking down the history of architecture into its fundamental components, the text is divided into 15 volumes and functions as “a technophilic treatise on the state of architectural thinking in the twenty-first century.” Despite providing lessons in architectural history, does the book deliver a compelling synthesis of all its parts? In his full review of the book for Metropolis Magazine, Samuel Medina argues that Koolhaas “fails to unpack the language of his argument,” resulting in a book that is “ambitious, overreaching, maddening” – much like the exhibition itself.

ryanpanos:

The High Line Before The High Line | Build

ryanpanos:

House Husarö | Tham & Videgård | Via

drawingarchitecture:

Dimitris Argyros, Luxor by Horse, 2007, mixed media.

drawingarchitecture:

Dimitris Argyros, Luxor by Horse, 2007, mixed media.

ryanpanos:

Roy-Lawrence Residence | Chevalier Morales Architects | Via

Located outside the village of Sutton, in Quebec’s eastern townships, the Roy-Lawrence Residence is set in a vast estate very much impregnated with the legacy of a Swiss immigrant family that came to Canada in the 1930’s. To this date, the surroundings of the residence are still defined by bucolic landscapes, iconic Swiss chalets and other buildings of similar nature that were erected along the years, always with a consistent touch of nostalgia.